Saturday, December 3, 2011

Lunch Art


Our school has no art program and no art class. Rather, we are the anti-art, since our focus is rigor. This has driven me nuts every year, even before the rigor part. Nevertheless, I have a bunch of art stuff. Some came from Karen when she retired, some came from Suzanne when she want back to OMA (which is primarily music in our school), and some of it was mine. But I'm a teacher -- it's against the Teacher Law to throw away things that are perfectly useful, even if we can't use it during school. Then it came to me: Recess is our time. How many recesses have I given up over the past five years for detention? So I decided that (with occasional exceptions), anyone who wants to come in at recess time after they've eaten their lunch may do so, and we'll do art stuff. Sometimes I've taught them how to do things, like how to draw winter snowy pictures with chalk (and glitter for the moon). I bought some dollar store paints and pipe cleaners, but everything else came from the room: paper, oil pastels, water colors, glue, markers, crayons. They only have 15-20 minutes, so I tend to just turn them loose most of the time. These pics begin with the earliest lunch art and move forward. I only take occasional pictures, just to record new things or highlights. All of these were taken with my phone, which automatically posts pictures to photobucket. Enjoy! Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Saturday, October 22, 2011

As The Desks Move


Or Turn. Whatever. It’s been a quiet week in Lake Woebegon, but not so quiet in Snarkyville. A week before report card day (RCD was last Friday), at the end of the day G went home a few minutes early because he was picked up. We had been outside playing soccer, and didn’t hear or understand the announcement looking for us. No matter. He was already packed to go home, as they all were, so he grabbed his backpack, said good-bye, and left. Got to school this past Monday, and when I went to do attendance, he was already marked absent with an E code (I’m guessing that’s for Excused). Same with Tuesday. The office said it was a family matter, and they’d explain it when he returned. I could guess what that was, and was partially right. His mother had been doing overnights at the jail, I’d found out about a month ago, for DWI. It was hard on the kids because she didn’t get out in the morning until they were at school. I’m not sure who they were staying with during that time. This was making it hard for her to work (and feed herself, because she was concentrating on feeding the kids), which is how the school found out I guess. We’re used to that, and they got her hooked up with a food source. She was working with some organization, though, that had an educational component, and she came and did something fun and sciency with the kids one day. Well, apparently she got another DUI during this time and her overnights were over. She became a full-time guest of the powers that be. This meant that the kids had to stay with a relative on the other side of town, and wouldn’t be coming back to our school. Not that we pick favorites, mind you, but if we did, he’d be at or near the top of the list. He’s the sweetest kid, always trying hard, and a total Harry Potter geek. My kind of kid. In the meantime, this past week I also found out that yesterday would be A’s last day. (I have about 7 As, by the way!) He was on the sweet-but-exhausting list. We got to say good-bye to him, though, which was nice. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, I was notified at lunch on yesterday that I’m getting a new student — from the ELD (English learners with some other letters in there) class. She is upset about coming, of course, but she did know one of the girls (because her twin is in that class), so she’s willing to sit in her group. She’s new to the school this year. It’s turning out to be a good thing that we have Circle Time (restorative circle) every Monday morning, because we’ll have closure and new student issues to deal with. We made A a going away sign, Y a welcome sign, and we wrote letters to G, which I included in a packet of stuff that I shipped over to his school (his notebooks, folders, report card, etc. I don’t imagine his grandmother can get all new stuff, since she doesn’t have a car.) So it’s been a tiring week, to say the least. In the midst of this, they keep trickling down all sorts of stress and last-minute stuff and unorganized stuff. I decided not to go for National Board Certification at this time. It came down to the concept that I can’t have my whole life revolve around my job. It already takes up enough of my free time, and I just don’t have any more to put into it at the moment. If the school hasn’t imploded by next year, I may rethink it. Or not. And that’s the news from Lake Woebegon. Or Snarkyville.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Rigor


Yes, that’s the buzz word of the year. Rigor. The longer version is Cognitive Dissonance. All school work should be hard and uncomfortable. If they can do it without your help, if they can do it without you teaching the skill first, it’s too easy. More importantly: Rigor means that not a single child over Kindergarten may color at all, period, during the school day. If you want them to color, it has to be homework (where there are no crayons, let it be noted). Obviously, I’m not against children working hard. I’m also not against age-appropriate practices, and for first graders, coloring is an important skill. As they learn to stay within the lines, they learn to use crayons and thus are also learning to use pencils to write legibly. It’s a scaffolding of skills. It is also a Zen brain-dump time. That’s VERY important, especially for children…except at our school. Others are having Rigor dumped on them as well, but I don’t know how it’s manifesting itself. Did I mention that the district foolishly sent out a survey, asking our opinions? Well, rest assured that I shared mine. For example, one question asked how we could make our district better, or better able to reach its goals, or whatever. And so I set forth on my opinion — which a lot of others shared and expressed. How about the drastic notion of equal distribution of resources? Our school has been at the short end of the stick for all resources. Do they seriously believe that my students will be just as successful as those from resource-laden schools? And then they have the nerve to dump an incredible amount of money and resources into the school down the street — such as everyone having laptops. There are two computers in my classroom, and I had to fight for the second one. I only got it because my Promethean board was put in the wrong spot. The school year is 1/4 over, and we’re all exhausted. Morale keeps dropping. Our weekly PD is totally about the new math standards. The problem is that most of us won’t be using them until AT LEAST next year, and those using it this year are already taking a ton of workshops throughout the year on it. So of course, we’re not doing anything useful for this year. When they said at the end of this past week’s that we were doing this yet again (we’ve had 3 or 4 weeks of this, so far), I asked if they could put it at the end of the year. Otherwise, I’ll not only forget everything they said by next year, I’ll also have lost everything they’ve given me. Sigh.

Monday, September 12, 2011


So on Friday, the painter comes and tells me that they'll be painting my room on Monday and Tuesday, and I'll be in a portable.  Dandy.  The office tells me that it's Portable 18 (a.k.a. P-18).  However, another teacher is in there, so I can't move our stuff Friday.  We have to wait until Monday. No problem.  I have the kids put on their desks what we'll need for the two days, and after they leave I add the other things that we'll need.  On Monday we will grab and go.  Right?  You see that this will obviously go smoothly? Today is Monday.  I meet Suzanne in the parking lot, who happens to have a key to P-18.  It is a key that turns out to not work.  I run into the principal.  Hers doesn't either.  She calls Virgil.  His doesn't either.  I am to be in a portable that no one can open.  In the meantime, it starts raining, so the kids are going inside before the bell rings, but mine were told to be at P-18.  Finally they decide that we'll be in P-7.  However, this school is a whole lot like a Catholic church I used to go to in Syracuse -- half the congregation shows up during the opening song, not before.  So I have 13 out of 24 kids, and I load them down the best I can.  We race through the rain to P-7. I get there and Miss F is there.  There are many desks.  Many.  Most are stacked on each other.  There are 3 or 4 chairs.  No problem.  I spy a rolled up rug.  We will sit on the floor (by "we" I mean everyone under the age of 53). This portable makes my previous rooms look like the Taj Mahal.  I took other pics at the end of the day, so you can get the full effect of our 2-day home.  There is no clock.  However, I have my cell phone and a timer, so I set the timer to go off when each next thing should happen.  There is no flag, so I draw one on the board.  There is no computer, so I send the attendance with Miss F, who has to go back through the rain anyway.  There is also rainy day recess -- so after their lunch, they are stuck in the room with me, far from our rainy day recess stuff.  However, I brought an entire box of yellow chalk and we have many dry-erase markers.  These will do, and the kids have a great time.  There was no actual teacher desk, so I used a table to pile stuff on. We only managed to grab 3 out of 4 SFA baskets, so there is much sharing of books and Team Talk packets.  Not all children have their notebooks to write in, but I brought plenty of paper.  I'm used to having fun with my Promethean Board during SFA (and math), and suddenly I have nothing.  No problem.  It was a loooooooong morning, but we managed. We brought the small dry erase boards (every one of my students have one -- in the real classroom; I drag those along every time I change classrooms) and so we nearly had enough boards, nearly enough markers, and nearly enough math books.  I did remind the kids that children in some countries sit on dirt floors.  I am ever so helpful, right?  On the plus side, after lunch, because we eat earlier on rainy days for some odd reason, we had time for me to nearly finish reading James and the Giant Peach.  We'll finish that tomorrow. This week is book fair, and we had our scheduled time to go look at it, which broke up part of the afternoon. I tried to make it as fun or adventurous for the kids as possible, but I'd managed to forget how very lonely it is out in the portables.  But I did take lots of pictures, so we can look back on this adventure later on in the year.  The other pictures of the whiteboard are for me to remember, because I often do this stuff and forget about it.  We are to be writing descriptive paragraphs, so we talked about setting and they had to write a setting for a story.  They could come up with the setting but not so much how to write about it, so I did a sentence, and then 2 or 3 more myself. Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Picture Day


Yes, today was school picture day. Yes, I survived. It is one of those things that gives me great pride (the surviving part). First, when kids bring in money during the days leading up to picture day, we tend to put them in the big envelope we’re given for safekeeping. However, we don’t ever actually write on that envelope. I was told from the beginning “don’t bother,” so I don’t. Sometimes they want the kids lined up by height, and sometimes in alphabetical order. Today was a height day. So we get there (in no order at all, so I don’t feel frustrated by guessing wrong and wrangling kittens), and I put them by height as instructed. Then one of the helpers says “You’re supposed to write on the envelope so that you know who ordered pictures.” Now, my very first thought is “What do I care who ordered pictures?” But, being polite, I tell her that we were told not to bother. We do the class picture (for the very first time, every single kid showed up for picture day), and then I’m told to give them the card with their name on it and their money envelope if they have it. Then I try to tell which kid is which in the small version of the class picture, so I can write their name. I didn’t do well, so after we got our individual pictures done, the kids helped me. OK, 3 or 4 helped me while I tried not to sell the others to any nearby adult. In the meantime, although they said the very same things to Ms. Allen, the next person gave her a hard time for passing out the payment envelopes (as she was told to do). Now, moving backwards in time, on Wednesday, the principal had a meeting with the parents of Kindergarten, fourth, and fifth graders. K has so many kids that they’re hiring a new teacher (and thus splitting up classes). The parents were all ok with everything — 4/5 split, juggling, etc. Then, right before lunch she gets a phone call from the district: We can keep 4/5 the way we are, and hire an additional teacher to teach K. So I’m back to being what I’ve been all along. I’ll admit that I was looking forward to the challenge, but it’s not the end of the world or anything. After school that day, a teacher I like who used to be there and is now at another school came by. She and another former teacher hate their schools this year. Hate them. They are miserable. So this one is applying for the K position, and when she was here before she did work in K. I’m hoping she gets it! So it’s weird to think that, with all the frustrations and lacks at that school (lacks? Is that a correct word?), there are worse schools. I got mail this week — my very first royalty check. OK, so it was for $4.95, from WordClay, and it confirmed what I suspected: Glenna has the only paperback copy of the book. I bought it for her for her birthday. I told her she should note that it might be worth a lot of money someday! It’s not that the book is all that awful, just that people won’t buy books that have no reviews. At least that’s what other e-published people tell me. Then again, no reviews are better than awful ones, right? I was sick last weekend (I still sound horrible, but do feel much better), and got my reading lesson plans done and a math one, but not much else. I have been trying to catch up each night. So yeah, lunch time today isn’t the time to plan the science lesson that’s right after lunch. Then again, if the special ed kids weren’t coming, I probably would’ve done writing instead. We are still on weather. So I gathered data from the internet and we made a chart, recording the high/low temps, cloudy (etc.), and humidity of various cities, including mine, Madison, Perth, Cape Town, London, Yuma, Juneau, and Mexico City. They got to see that although it’s summer in Alaska and winter in Perth, it’s a little warmer in Perth. Only 5% humidity in Yuma (and 114 or something); I pointed out that’s the weather when you hang clothes on the line and they’re done drying already. They totally got that. I didn’t just write the data — I had them guessing stuff too, like which cities would have the highest humidity (the 2 that were raining), and why was the humidity 97% and 94% and not 100%. I’m always pleased when there’s a student who can figure that out. Eventually we went outside with our anemometers (since we didn’t do that last week) and measured wind speed in various locations, including comparing up high and down low. Finally, if you looked around the sky, there were at least 5 or 6 different types of clouds. It was really cool. So I told them to illustrate those in their science notebooks and we’ll find out tomorrow what kind they are. It was fun, in that they like going outside and moving around (and note it was toasty and we stayed in the shade). Until next time…

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Math Enrichment — Centers


I've never done real centers before. In my first two schools, such things were forbidden. In my last school, what I called centers was a time when students could choose from a vast array of educational things (including games, a microscope, etc.). But I never did actual centers of any kind. At the end of last year, it was decided that we would have a math enrichment day weekly, or at least within each math unit. One of the reasons was that it wasn't long before we stopped using manipulatives. The program seemed to require the manipulatives for one introductory problem, or two on a good day, and that was it. However, there was also the time spent getting them out, passing them out, getting the students to return to being on-task, collecting them, etc. The time spent on the busy-ness was double the time spent on using the learning tools, and a huge segment of our math period had been sucked away. Since tomorrow is our first math test (Topic One), I had to come up with a reasonable enrichment thing to do. Last Friday the students became adept at counting the play money and making the amount shown on the card, so that wasn't a need. What I came up with for today was five centers. The centers did not take the same amount of time, and students might not be finished with one before they were moved to another, but they could return to the unfinished one when they had the time. One was 2-minute addition flash cards. Yes, we're fourth grade. Trust me on this, though. The timer was set for two minutes, and one student showed the other the flash cards. That second student collected every correctly answered card. At the end of the two minutes, they wrote down (on the back of their answer sheet) how many they got right. Then they switched jobs. Photobucket The "equality" center used the timer for six minutes. One student could place no more than five of the number blocks in the left side of the math program's e-tools component. The partner had to use at least one different block, and add blocks until the equal sign in the middle showed that the two sides matched. Then they switched roles. Photobucket In the making change center, students had problems on the front of their answer sheet such as "change for $3.25 from $10.00." The skill in our text is counting up to make change, and we had already done that lesson. However, it was better to show them with play money that they could touch and move around. After they made the change and wrote it down, their partner had to prove the answer was right by adding the original amount of money ($3.25) and coming up with the correct total ($10.00). This was one of the two centers that had room for many people to work at the same time. Students might be pulled from here to work on a quicker center and then returned. (Otherwise, no one would ever get to the quick ones until suddenly half the class was ready for them!) Photobucket In the expanded notation center, students used the number blocks (like the virtual ones in the equality center) to create the numbers on the answer sheet. Then they simply spread them out by category and wrote the number in expanded notation. This made expanded notation so much easier for them to understand, especially with the issues of zeroes within numbers. Photobucket Finally, there was the flip-chart center. Students dragged numbers into various place value columns to create 4-digit numbers. They did this on my laptop. Then they sat where they could see the Promethean Board, and wrote out three of their numbers (most made 5) in written form on the back of their answer sheets. Photobucket All of these were skills that the students needed to review for tomorrow's Topic One test. At the end, I had the students do a quick write on sticky notes about how it went for them. More than a few thought making change was hard. Some thought most of it was easy. They all enjoyed being able to go from center to center, though, and the hands-on activities. I'm not sure how well Topic Two will lend itself to this, though. It's adding and subtracting whole numbers, including mental math and estimating sums and differences. Have you done centers? Any words of advice? Ideas for Topic Two?

Monday, August 22, 2011

Monday Resource: It's not just the classroom


If you are reading elsewhere, you'll note that I've just finished the first week of the new school year. Today's resource is about getting ready for the new year, but it's not just the classroom. It's us. You have varying degrees of teaching experience as well as varying locations. You may be in a standard classroom, a portable, teaching on-line, or in your kitchen. If you've done this before, the amount of help you need in this area may be limited to none. For my first part, though, I want to talk about a different sort of getting ready. One of my more recent bookmarks is A New Mantra for a New School Year. I love reading this article, and am working on my own mantra for this year. I like the author's past and present mantras: Be Present and Be Professional. I think mine for this year should be Be Organized. I start off mostly organized as I unpack in a new room (second year in a row), but I hit a wall. At that point, whatever's left gets shoved into any nook or cranny. I'm also very much trying to Be Neat (which, um, leaves me grateful for the nooks and crannies). One way I'm being organized is my notebook. It is a composition notebook with colorful peace signs on it. I originally got it for meeting notes, but it has already turned into much more than that in a short time. For example, we did a quick write last week. Students wrote on sticky notes how they were doing, what they were having trouble with, etc. I taped those straight into the notebook for easy reference. I have notes on everything in there: a conversation with the nurse about a student with seizures, finding out a new student has an IEP and needs to go to resource, etc. A mother came to my room this morning with a concern; it went straight into the notebook. A parent wrote a note last week, that's now taped into the notebook. I won't have to hunt for information or this little bits that tend to get lost in the shuffle. Another resource I must mention is Christine Kane and her Word of the Year. While Russ Goerend tells you about his journey and his mantra, Christine Kane helps you take the next step by finding or creating your own word of the year. Actually, her web site does much more than that, and I strongly recommend you find the time to read at least some of it. (I found her in my quest for information on Vision Boards.) These two resources will help you get your mind or spirit ready for a new year of growth and success. I am also a very practical person, though. Although I'm beginning my 13th year of teaching, I am always looking for helpful ideas and practices. I adore FlyLady, and she has a Teacher Control Journal that she explains a bit about here and can be printed off here. (Her web site is here if you're interested in non-teacher aspects of what she does.) I especially like that it's meant to be modified to meet one's own needs. To honor the newest among our ranks, here is also a link for getting ready for back to school. There are many helpful sites, but that one has other useful information as well. I wish you all a great school year!

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Additional Pictures Now That School Has Started

You'll note that in an earlier Monday Resources post about blogs, I referred to a web site that walks you through blogging with students. This week we went over blogs and internet safety (see "posters"), and today we began making paper blogs as indicated at that web site. It was really an interesting experience.

Today the Exceptional Ed students (4) joined us for Science and the PE that's called Extended Recess.

I have not yet had everyone show up to school on the same day. A friend has a ton of absences due to illness already!

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Day 2 -- 8/16/11

One student went home sick without ever making it into the classroom, and two more joined our class. One was absent yesterday because of seizures. He's one of the kids I had in SFA last year. As soon as he was settled, I called the nurse (who is new to our school) and asked for an information sheet. She asked his name, and I told her. I expected to eventually get some ancient typed sheet on seizures, which is what nurses at previous schools would have done. Nope. She came to my room with something she typed after she obviously spoke to the lad's mother first. Three long paragraphs. She didn't even just hand it to me; she stood there and went over it with me. Nice!! The seizures are a recent thing of unknown origin. My first thought was Connor Bourke, who just died this summer after a long battle with a brain tumor. My brain always jumps to the worst thing first. But he has more testing today, and then we'll know more. In the mean time, his name tags on the top and front of his desk have a red circle dot with an S in them, in case there's ever a sub.

In writing, we are talking about blogs. Next week, I hope, they will start their own blogs. They've done a paragraph for a first entry, and we've managed to do a lot about blogs and internet safety in two days. The principal came in yesterday while we they were doing the writing part, and she was pretty impressed.

In reading we're doing the "AIMS Reading Process" (that I was taught at this school) with nonfiction passages, and reading James and the Giant Peach. We're doing science and PE on Thursday and Friday. Oh, excuse me, "extended recess." They have to call it that because we're not PE teachers -- but we're teaching PE. Next week we start OMA and library.

I'll write about math later.

First Day of School: August 15, 2011

Yes, we all survived the first day of school! Five or six of my students were no-shows, but two were added. I'd forgotten just how much you can learn about children on the first day of school. One girl's mother said she was nervous, and she was all shy for maybe ten minutes -- after which she never stopped talking. She does like to help her classmates, though. There were a couple of students who didn't seem to understand much of what I was saying, but then there were times that no one did (such as "Pass the papers forward"). We shall see!

Moving "Inside"

(Written a couple of weeks ago but not posted)

If you followed the Desert Duck, you know that I have spent the past four years "in the portables," also known (by some of us, at least) as Snarkyville. Although these trailers were decrepit fire hazards, I had no fears of burning down because in case of emergency, I'm fairly sure that any fourth grader could kick out a wall with one kick.

BUT -- I'm moving into The Building! Yes, my classroom will be an actual classroom -- AND I'll have a Promethean Board! I am truly excited! So this week (yes, still on summer vacation), I'm moving. I had to unpack all my closets and cupboards, and will post those photos as soon as I get them off my camera (probably this afternoon). On Monday I unpacked the two closets, and yesterday the cupboards. I moved two things over to the new room, but the maintenance man was moving the furniture from that room to Ms. R's new room, and it was hot and a long trip to be moving stuff, so I decided to go back this morning to get my stuff moved. (I have to move my stuff, and maintenance will move the furniture.)

One reason the furniture has to be moved is that I have "taller" 4th grade furniture; the stuff in that room is for first graders. Little guys. Another reason is that we need to empty out the portables in case the new school isn't open yet. They may have to start the year out using our portables.

Life in the portables meant that, while I had the illusion of controlling my own heat and cooling, there were ... issues. For example, on more than one occasion, turning on the heat in the morning meant setting off the fire alarm.

There are lots of "strangers" wandering around campus and walking through the portable area. However, if you're in the building, that usually means that you went through the office first, and someone knows you're there. This means that now, my students will be a whole lot safer going to the restroom. In the portables, the restroom is a trailer with 3 doors that open to the outside. Any one of the people wandering through could be hanging out in either of the kid restrooms at any time.

School Blog Time!


From the edublog (I'm migrating those here, so I can have just one teaching blog): Last year, I had one WordPress account and had all my students post on that one. It really wasn’t all that great, in the long run. This year, I want them each to have their own account. I want them to experience the fun of “prettying it up” as well as seeing their words in print. This year, I also want them to comment on other people’s blogs, both inside and outside of our classroom. Wish me luck! UPDATE on 7/18/2012: Some of the students got their blog "prettied up" and a couple even got something posted. The problem was primarily that we had planned, with the principal's permission, to actually get to use the computer lab. Then she decided that only RTI could use it, and our techy said that the students weren't allowed to use the classroom computer; it was for teacher use only. That pretty much ended the whole blog thing.

Sunday, August 14, 2011

School Eve

What do teachers think about the night before school starts? I don't know about everyone else, but I can tell you what I think about every year.

I worry that I won't get to sleep. I fervently hope that no one will throw up or wet themselves because they were too shy to say something. Yes, I teach fourth grade, and yes, it's happened (the latter). Just as kids worry if their teacher is nice or will like them, I worry about the same thing.

Am I ready? Will I have everything I need? Will everything go smoothly? Will I remember to not talk too fast? Will I adjust to being "inside" finally, after all those years in trailers? (Well, only four years, but it seems like a long time.)

Will I remember my lunch? Will the Promethean Board work without a hitch? Will I get everything done? Will I end up having not enough to do? (I seriously doubt that one!) Will there be anyone who's new to the school? Will my class be nice to the Exceptional Ed students on Thursday and Friday? Who has what special needs? Who will show up without having had breakfast? Who is afraid? What if I forget to bring or do something?

I have to remember that incoming fourth graders are pretty much third graders, not children who are in the same spot as my last class was on the last day of school!

I hope it's a good year! Keep us in your thoughts!

Friday, August 12, 2011

Ready for Monday!

School starts on Monday, August 15th for us. I couldn't put much on the actual walls, because they're going to be painted still. The two red places next to the Promethean Board are just paper taped up to cover up the ghastly spot where the bulletin board or chalkboard used to be.

Our school is in a very transitional neighborhood. Every year I make stuff with names on it, and 7-8 students don't show up, but a bunch of different ones do, and I quickly run out. This year, the desks just say boy or girl. When students arrive, they can choose (visitors today have their spots picked out). Between the students and I, we'll put their names on their desks, mailboxes, cards, folders, notebooks, etc.

The two green bins have recess balls and jump ropes. The circular things are hula hoops. The last week of school last year, I had my class make "Welcome to Fourth Grade" signs for the incoming class. The blue baskets with the empty bottom shelf are for SFA (reading). We don't start that for two weeks. Each basket is for one group, and the bottom shelf will be for the SFA book bucket.

A friend of mine gave me the teapot, which has cats on it. It combines two things I love! I do still have to get a couple of lesson plans done, and I have to post the language objectives. Otherwise, I'm good to go!

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